Contact Us

Use the form on the right to contact us.

You can edit the text in this area, and change where the contact form on the right submits to, by entering edit mode using the modes on the bottom right. 

         

123 Street Avenue, City Town, 99999

(123) 555-6789

email@address.com

 

You can set your address, phone number, email and site description in the settings tab.
Link to read me page with more information.

525888_10150969588153125_1366222626_n.jpg

Blog

I now live and work mainly in London where I have a studio and a growing audience for my paintings. I still have strong family ties with Cornwall. Here in London I benefit from the urban buzz of living in a mega city, finding inspiration in the huge variety of art in the galleries here and find the ever changing urban landscape an inspiring contrast to the slower pace of the countryside. That you can take the woman out of Cornwall but can't take Cornwall out of the woman is so true. Having grown up surrounded by the natural beauty and cultural heritage of Cornwall, I find that  the subjects that  offer me a glimpse of nature, even here in London, are the ones that I am most drawn to.

 

Exhibitions

Jacqui Hatton

 Upcoming Exhibitions

June Turbine House, Reading

July Monmouth Museum, Lady Park Wood II - in collaboration with ecologist George Peterken

December     National Memorial Arboretum Staffordshire

2020    

Exmoor & Dartmoor, National Park Authorities, Taunton

Past Exhibitions

2019  Collégiale Sainte-Croix de Loudun, Loudun, France

2018 Drawn To London, Bermondsey Project Space, London until November 3rd 2018

2018 The Mariners Gallery, St.Ives, Cornwall until Noember 20th 2018

2018 Monmouth Museum, Lady Park Wood Project in collaboration with ecologist George Peterken

2018  Black Swan Arts, Frome Somerset

2018   John Davies Gallery, Moreton-in-Marsh, Gloucestershire

IMG_0702.JPG

a different voice...

Jacqui Hatton

 

 

 

                                                   ‘…the way people talk about their lives is of significance, that the language they use and the connections they make reveal the world that they see and in which they act.’  Carole Gilligan

+++

I have allowed my love of the beauty of woodlands a free rein in these recent paintings. However, I find that other themes emerge and what appears on the canvas is more than a simple image of woodland. Intuitive gestures made with paint belie the complexity of the relationship between circumstance, locality and context.  The ancient trees that are my current subject are so old that they represent the concept of time, they link my consciousness to the lives of my ancestors and their scarcity is a reminder of the deforestation that is so threatening in our post-modern era. So a landscape painting is never just a landscape but has this interestingly dream like aspect, interwoven and interconnecting, where all of those themes coincide. 

With regard to the process that initiated my current work, locating my 'voice' is a triangulation between memory, photography and canvas or hand, eye and mind. What I have found is that my voice is an amalgam. Its constituent parts being those of myself, with mechanical processes and products - such as photography. I am surprised and intrigued by the way these aspects blend together on the canvas. 

It is said of painting that it embodies all that the artist is and has experienced. Therefor tucked in with the layers of paint must be not only my knowledge of painting, but the cultural experience of growing up in Cornwall, my artistic and scientific interests, the punchy imagery of pop culture and so on. In addition, I know my visual memory to be full of inaccuracies; distortions are brought about by the physical and emotional sensitivity to being in a wood. Those experiences leave a residue in my mind which I try to recapture in painting.

The influence that photography has had on my perception and style of visual representation is marked in my latest paintings.  Also there are the industrially produced physical materials of paintings; the wood, cotton canvas, chemicals, oil and stone that constitute oil paint, even the car that conveys me to and from the sites of the trees and the painting materials from one place to another. All are products derived from nature. In my mind they complete a circle that joins the physical with the ethereal, giving form to experience and ideas as they meet with 'realities'.

 

 

 

Sleepy winter Thames -

Jacqui Hatton

Often relying on my camera as an aid to memory, I had temporarily forgotten what pleasure a sketchbook can be. A sort of playground for paint and pencils.  I have been venturing out to sit with my flask, sketch book, pencils and watercolours, and to see how trying to keep up with nature's constant re-ordering will push my painting along.